Reading Teacher Writes

Sharing a love of literacy with fellow readers and writers

Slice of Life Tuesday: Writing to Stay Awake

3 Comments

I just looked at the date for my last post: August 12. What a disgrace! How can I expect my students to write daily if I cannot write daily? Well, we talked about that today in a conferring session. I was sharing with a student who hates to write (her words). We discussed how writing is a mindful activity, one full of thinking and acting and thinking…it’s exhausting! I shared with her that sometimes I write just to keep myself going. Maybe I look at a favorite picture, then write to describe a part of it I have not viewed before. Maybe I write a “to-do” list for the next day. Maybe I send one of my kids a text with a little information and an “I love you” reminder. Anything to keep going, keep writing. All writing counts. My goal for her is that she will see writing as an outlet, and as an effective means of communication. I told her I wanted her to publish something great — whatever she wants!

I promised this student that we would keep in touch throughout the year. She will share her thoughts, experiences, observations, and writing with me, and I will do the same. I love that I am able to share my writing with students, and I look forward to reading their writing as we move through the school year.  For now, I continue to write, to stay awake.

For those of you starting a new school year with students today, Have a GREAT Year!

Author: Jennifer Sniadecki

I write about reading and literacy education. My passion is sharing titles I use for reading and writing workshop teaching. My goal is collaborating, researching, and sharing with other life-long literacy learners. Welcome to my blog!

3 thoughts on “Slice of Life Tuesday: Writing to Stay Awake

  1. I think this is so powerful. You will develop such a great bond by sharing together and maybe her reluctance to write will change more quickly because of this.

  2. It’s so great that you made that connection – writer to writer.

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