Slice of Life Tuesdays: I Couldn’t Wait

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Slice of Life Small LogoI Couldn’t Wait

I had to start my Book-a-Day summer challenge on Sunday. I couldn’t wait until my summer — my summer doesn’t start until June 11th! (And it ends early, as well. Boo hoo.) There are so many books to read, so many characters to meet, so many awesome authors who have written new works!

The Book-a-Day challenge (#bookaday) is a challenge where you read a book a day (on average) for a number of days, all set up by you — yourself — as a challenge to read more, read widely. You can read picture books, poetry, short stories, novels, nonfiction, ANYTHING! I wanted to start after reading Donalyn Miller’s (The Book Whisperer, Reading in the Wild) challenge last year.  I read for 40 days, no problem. But I didn’t share every day, which is my goal this year.  Sharing is the best part. You read, and others recommend, and you read more! It’s an excellent way to spend your time, trust me!

RSBookI started with three professional books:

Day 1) The Unstoppable Writing Teacher (M. Colleen Cruz)

Day 2) Reading Workshop 2.0: Supporting Readers in the Digital Age (Frank Serafini)

Day 3) The Reading Strategies Book (Jennifer Serravallo) I received this one today after waiting, waiting, waiting!  (This will take me longer than a day, but I’ll read a picture book to go with each day, so that counts!)

I have to get back to reading, now. LOL Why don’t you join me?

 

Slice of Life Tuesday: More on #bookaday (and Giving Books a Chance)

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I’ve challenged myself this summer to do more reading and writing. I returned from my writing conference with many ideas for writing — both for myself and for my students. My #bookaday challenge is fun! I re-read many books, and found five new ones that are on my “to do” list. I’ve plugged along at a pretty good pace, and I’ve been thankful for the time to work on these activities. I love summer reading and writing! I wish I could do this all year. Then, last week, reading screeched to a halt. Stop sign! An obstacle.

Last week’s book was Seating Arrangements, by Maggie Shipstead. After reading the first two chapters, I wanted to put it away. I actually did for a few days, reading David Sedaris’ Let’s Explore Diabetes With Owls instead. My daughter, a writer in college, told me to pick up the book again, and read through the 4th and 5th chapters. I told her that I was about ready to abandon the book; I can’t get into it because there’s not much happening. There’s almost too much description. I have actually turned off the “movie in my mind” because I don’t really care what the characters look like, or who is in each room, or what items are on the kitchen table. I want to know what happens! My grown, intellectual child told me that’s what writers do: they set up the characters and the scenes in the first three to four chapters, so you, as a reader, will know how to follow what may be a complicated plot.

“Oh, I see.”

(I knew that, actually.)

It’s been many years since I let a book die on my bedside table. I’m not one to give up on a book — I keep reading, even if it takes me months — and most of the time, I finish the book and give it a great review. I have read so many books that set up characters first, but I guess maybe I just want this book to keep moving…I don’t know why. Maybe it’s because I have a goal of 30 books, and this is my eleventh of the summer.) “Don’t give up, Mom. Give it a chance.”

I am both willing and able to give Seating Arrangements another chance. I’m going back to chapter three today. I read the reviews again, and the back cover of the book with all the praise for this “hilarious and deeply moving” story. I want to make sure I give it “the ol’ college try” (love to my daughter for keeping me going).

Have you ever given up on a book? Pick it up again, and re-read. Maybe you’ll enjoy it. Give it a chance.