IMWAYR: Mixing It Up

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Fall break provided rich, relaxing reading time! Last week I finished books; this week I’m listening to a book and reading an adult title I’ve been waiting for.

I finished I Can Make This Promise, the debut by Christine Day. I loved the touching, complicated story of Edie and her family (and their secrets).

I finished Look Both Ways, by Jason Reynolds. (Check out my review later this week.) A five-star must read for those who love short stories and for those who love how characters interact throughout a text, weaving in and out of each other’s lives.

I’m listening to Thirteen Doorways: Wolves Behind Them All, by Laura Ruby. I love her work! This one is wonderful so far. It’s not what I expected!

Next up: The Water Dancer, by Ta-Nehisi Coates. Isn’t the cover beautiful? I heard about this one a while back, and now I think I have time to savor it.

It’s Monday! What are YOU reading?

It’s Monday! What are you Reading? is a meme hosted by Kathryn at Book Date. It is a great way to recap what you read and/or reviewed the previous week and to plan out your reading and reviews for the upcoming week. It’s also a great chance to see what others are reading right now…you just might discover your next “must-read” book!

Kellee Moye, of Unleashing Readers, and Kathryn decided to give “It’s Monday! What Are You Reading?” a kidlit focus. If you read and review books in children’s literature – picture books, chapter books, middle grade novels, young adult novels, anything in the world of kidlit – join us! We love this meme and think you will, too. We encourage everyone who participates to visit at least three of the other kidlit book bloggers that link up and leave comments for them.

Slice of Life Tuesdays: July 4th and Freedom, and Hope

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For me, July 4th brings complicated feelings this year. I’ve been out of sorts all day. Although it’s a day of celebration, it’s also a day of remembrance, thankfulness, and prayer. Watching current national news makes me feel ill, and yet when I read tweets and posts of my friends and family working hard to resist the gloom-and-doom, I have hope.

I am celebrating my freedom to speak and write.

I ran across several tweets today from Laura Ruby, author of York: The Shadow Cipher, a book I just finished reading (and loved). Her words brought to mind my own mouthiness (is that a word?) — speaking up against the cruel and insane people who think our country is now a better place than it was last year. I have friends and family who are gay, poor, and disabled. My own daughters and I have medical issues that need constant monitoring. I fear for the future, for my family’s future. I have no right to feel this way, while many people still do not enjoy these freedoms. It burns me up when I see and hear inequalities in life. As a white woman with a traditional family, I have no right to enjoy all this freedom while others don’t. But I have the freedom to speak and write. I need to use it more. I will; I promise. I feel blessed to have so many friends and family who support me, who read with me, and who write with me. I am able to say and do what I need to do without much backlash or fear. I feel lucky. 

Laura Ruby wrote about her own medical diagnosis and struggles with a person at a hotel who asked her questions about why she was upset and afraid after the last election. She was able to speak, and later write, about this incident. I am inspired by her spirited tweets. I don’t feel alone in the world — I know people like Laura are out there with me, being mouthy and telling their stories. She mentioned how she felt moved, hearing John Lewis’s acceptance speech for winning the National Book Award (for March: Book Three – part of a wonderful trilogy about his own experiences with civil rights issues), and how his words put so much into perspective for her. John Lewis couldn’t get a library card because of the color of his skin. He dreamed, and fought, and wrote his story to share with us. As I re-read his words today, I feel lucky.

I am celebrating my freedom to read and to learn.

As a teacher, it is my job to use my mouthiness to inspire a new generation of thinkers and learners who will carry on this struggle for independence. It’s not easy — it’s really hard. I appreciate my students’ needs, hopes, and dreams, and I want to hear what they have to say. It’s my job to introduce them to books — reading — that will expand their minds and hearts. It’s my job to teach them to write their stories, so that others can be inspired by them as much as I have been inspired. I am lucky. 

I am celebrating my freedom to teach.

July 4th is Independence Day. I don’t have to worry about looking different (as in un-American), buying what I need (and want), or living with people I love. I have excellent healthcare coverage (for now) and a wonderful job. I don’t fear leaving my neighborhood to do the daily tasks I need to do. It’s not fair. July 4th means freedom for me, and I am celebrating my hope for the future, just as others are still being oppressed. I wonder what I can do. I hope future citizens of America will be as lucky as I am.

Laura Ruby wrote, “Protest. Run for office. Create art.” I love that! Those freedoms exist, although many still have to struggle and fight for those freedoms. I want to help. Today, I’m not sure what good I’ll do. For me, this July 4th brings complicated feelings. Ms. Ruby inspires me, saying, “Make all the noise you can. We are our own best hope.” I am lucky. 

 

 

IMWAYR: York

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It’s Monday! What are you reading? 

I started York: Book One – The Shadow Cipher, by Laura Ruby and I’m hooked. I must say, I picked up the book after several recommendations and my continued fascination with New York City’s history. The introduction — New Year’s Eve, 1855 — set up just one of several stories of New York’s shining skyscrapers and compelling citizens. Theresa and Theodore Morningstarr, twins who had disappeared into the labyrinth of the Morningstarr Tower, left a puzzle for the people of New York before they disappeared. No one knew what happened to them. They just disappeared.

(Move forward in time)

In present day New York, Tess and Theo Biedermann spend time with their family and friends in one of the Morningstarr apartment buildings, constantly surrounded by the hum of tourists who each think he can solve the mystery of the Old York Cipher of long ago. The puzzle had never been solved.

When a real estate developer buys the building, the Biedermann’s must try to save their home, and find the answer to the puzzle. Is the Old York Cipher a true story?

You’ll have to read along with me.

I loved the opening lines of this tale! “The true story of any city is never a single tale; it’s a vast collection of stories with many heroes…” This lead made me think of our writing institute. Our theme was “We are Story.” I carried that theme, and that mission, with me this past year of teaching and living my own life. We ALL have stories to tell. I can’t wait to jump back into this — ah, these! — stories.

Happy Reading!