SOLSC Day 21: Skipping

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Slice of Life Small LogoThank you to the ladies at Two Writing Teachers (www.twowritingteachers.wordpress.com) for hosting the March Slice of Life Story Challenge!

Skipping

The older you get, the more deeply words affect you. Think of the word “skipping.” When you are young, you learn to crawl, walk, and skip. Skipping is happiness. Skipping is innocence. Skipping is laughter.

Then you grow into adolescence. You’re a rebel. You don’t follow rules; you try activities that prove you are independent. Skipping is hiding (in the school bathroom — “cutting class.”). Skipping is fiddling. Skipping is secrecy. The connotation of the word shifts to a more negative tone than in the “good ol’ days.”

As an adult, skipping becomes more consequential. Skipping work equals unemployment. Skipping a red light means high-cost ticket. Skipping is illegal. Skipping is corruption. Skipping is guilt.  I’m sorry I skipped out on posting yesterday. Another failed day of the challenge, too tired to stand up, too busy to write.

Skipping is bad news!

 

Day 23: SOLSC Slice of Life Story Challenge

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A Winning Weekend

We studied multiple-meaning words all year, and one word defined my weekend: winning.  I was thinking about posting this slice after 1:00 a.m., to be early for once, but now I’m glad I waited. My weekend revealed many definitions of “winning” and I plan to share my revelations in class this week. Winning, by definition, can be used as an adjective, a noun, or a verb, all generally meaning “gain or acquire.”

“Winning” as an adjective means (according to dictionary.com/thesaurus.com) “gaining, resulting in, or relating to victory in a contest or competition.”  Another version of winning states that it means “attractive.” I use both variations at once here — I couldn’t believe I was winning the game of Clue against the best board game players I know; I showed my winning smile proudly after beating Courtney!

I thought about my winnings and I decided that I share them with my family and friends. My many spoils Saturday and Sunday included time to watch movies,  play games, and relax after chores were done. I even reserved a brunch for the family at Tippecanoe Place, a famous historical mansion restored as a fancy meeting place. I felt like a winner, sharing good food and conversation in a unique atmosphere. Although my winnings did not include money, (I am still a poor teacher! LOL) I felt tonight that my loot came to me in the form of my little granddaughter who visited us before going home to bed.

I won! The verb. It means “to be successful or victorious.” I won this weekend because I was productive and happy AND now I have another authentic word study lesson to share with my students. “Winning” certainly does feel fantastic!