IMWAYR: Be “Professional” and Read

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Here we are, at the end of the first quarter of school, and I haven’t mentioned professional reading. As I prepare for upcoming PD days, I read our school’s recent book adoption, Every Child a Super Reader, by the outstanding literacy mentors Pam Allyn and Ernest Morrell.

Pam Allyn and Ernest Morrell point to 7 Strengths of a Super Reader, and they show how building these strengths in classrooms can help children to become lifelong readers. I love the practical uses and ideas mentioned here, and the way this professional book renewed my joy of reading.

It’s Monday! What are YOU reading?

IMWAYR: Big Week of Reading

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After last week’s amazing reunion with Kwame Alexander, I re-read Swing, since I have my signed copy in my hands now. This reading was “way” better than the Net Galley version. (No offense to Net Galley, but I feel that the digital copy did not support the intended view and flow of the lines of poetry — I just had to have the book!)

This is a big week for reading, here. I finished Hey, Kiddo by Jarrett Krosoczka just in time for tomorrow’s book birthday. What a read! (Check out my review.)

These are titles I haven’t mentioned before, but now that I got to travel to The Brain Lair Bookstore and pick up my copies, this is a perfect day for sharing!

Lady Pancake and Sir French Toast: Mission Defrostable by Josh Funk

The Remember Balloons by Jessie Oliveros 

We Are Grateful/Otsaliheliga by Traci Sorell (Thank you to Kathy at The Brain Lair Bookstore for making sure I had a copy. It’s beautiful!)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

What Do You Do With a Voice Like That? The Story of Extraordinary Congresswoman Barbara Jordan by Chris Barton (I got to meet Chris Barton at the bookstore, and he was so nice and I enjoyed his read aloud of this colorful and interesting book. It’s already on hold at the library — can’t wait to share it tomorrow!)

Next up: Liesl Shurtliff’s newest, Time Castaways: The Mona Lisa Key (Book 1). I peeked, and it seems like a great adventure read for fall break.

It’s Monday! What are YOU reading?

It’s Monday! What are you Reading? is a meme hosted by Kathryn at The Book Date. It is a great way to recap what you read and/or reviewed the previous week and to plan out your reading and reviews for the upcoming week. It’s also a great chance to see what others are reading right now…you just might discover your next “must-read” book!

Kellee Moye, of Unleashing Readers, and Jen Vincent, at Teach Mentor Texts decided to give It’s Monday! What Are You Reading? a kidlit focus. If you read and review books in children’s literature – picture books, chapter books, middle grade novels, young adult novels, anything in the world of kidlit – join us! We love this meme and think you will, too. We encourage everyone who participates to visit at least three of the other kidlit book bloggers that link up and leave comments for them.

Book Review: Hey, Kiddo by Jarrett J. Krosoczka

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Hey, Kiddo‘s subtitle is “How I Lost My Mother, Found My Father, and Dealt with Family Addiction.” Jarrett’s brave memoir is a graphic novel commentary for our times. Jarrett is brave to share his story in this memoir, and I’m so glad he did. We book lovers say, “Books save lives,” and I’m sure this particular book will help someone going through tough times.

One thing you need to know before reading this story is that, although it’s true that there are terrible forces in the world that overshadowed his family life, Jarrett’s story is not all sad. His grandparents who raised him are funny, smart, and loyal to each other. His mother does love him, although her addiction doesn’t allow her to be there for him. His friends are the same friends you and I have (and had) — they play games, go to dances at school, learn to drive, etc. Jarrett’s teachers in school take care of their students the best they know how, and Mr. Shilale, the art teacher, encourages Jarrett to stick with (and expand) his art studies. Again, I’m so glad Jarrett did. His early creative endeavors led him to write Lunch Lady graphic novels and books in the Star Wars: Jedi Academy series that we all know and love. Once he found his father, their growing relationship helped Jarrett grow to be a stronger man, too.

Why I Loved This Book: I loved that Jarrett Krosoczka opened his world and invited me in. I enjoyed getting to know him, and his family, and his story is one worth sharing. I love that this is a nonfiction graphic novel. The artwork is Jarrett’s own, and I love how he intertwined memorabilia into the pages (all the way down to his grandmother’s pineapple wallpaper). I love that this book is publishing in 2018, when so many students I know are facing hard family lives themselves, and I hope they are able to see themselves in this book.

Why You Should Read Hey, Kiddo: Read Hey, Kiddo to remember your youth. Read it to identify with the people in the book, and around you in your own life. Read the Author’s Notes in the back of the book — they will allow you to become Jarrett’s friend. Read it to enjoy the art and creativity. Read it to inspire you to share your story.

 

 

 

IMWAYR: Aru Shah and the End of Time by Roshani Chokshi

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“Rick Riordan Presents” title, Aru Shah and the End of Time, by Roshani Chokshi is my new pick this week. It came to me highly recommended, so I moved it to the top of my “To Be Read” list. Here’s what the back cover has to say:

“Percy Jackson meets Sailor Moon in this inaugural title in the Rick Riordan Presents program, a wild – and wildly funny – epic journey based on Hindu mythology.”

The words, “wildly funny” got me. I need some laughs this week.

Coming Up: Next week is Banned Books Week! I have a LOT of titles to re-read during the celebration of the right to read!

Happy Reading!

 

It’s Monday! What are you Reading? is a meme hosted by Kathryn at The Book Date. It is a great way to recap what you read and/or reviewed the previous week and to plan out your reading and reviews for the upcoming week. It’s also a great chance to see what others are reading right now…you just might discover your next “must-read” book!

Kellee Moye, of Unleashing Readers, and Jen Vincent, at Teach Mentor Texts decided to give It’s Monday! What Are You Reading? a kidlit focus. If you read and review books in children’s literature – picture books, chapter books, middle grade novels, young adult novels, anything in the world of kidlit – join us! We love this meme and think you will, too. We encourage everyone who participates to visit at least three of the other kidlit book bloggers that link up and leave comments for them.

Book Review: A Pocketful of Poems

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I love it when Nikki Grimes shows the reader different types of poetry — She’s a master at placing words to catch your interest and attention. Pocketful of Poems (2001) features haiku. The narrator, Tiana, celebrates the seasons with words she finds in her pocket. Spring, pigeon, homer (reminds me to cheer for my baseball team), pumpkin (which reminds me of my favorite season), and gift are just some of the words Tiana invites you to use to create your own haiku poems. Exploring Javaka Steptoe’s textures and creative placement of color and objects on the page make this book even more fun to read over and over. The hand-sculpted gilded alphabet makes me want some letters for my own pocket. Celebrate the seasons with Tiana, and maybe even write something yourself.

IMWAYR: Light and Dark Reading and an Anniversary

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I was not as much of a dedicated reader as I wanted to be last week. Migraine headache vs. reading brain = knocked out. To overcome, I spent the weekend with a light a funny read and a dark, yet important graphic novel.

Santa Bruce by Ryan T. Higgins is the third in the Mother Bruce series, and it’s the best, in my opinion. “Bruce was a bear who did not like the holidays…Bruce also did not like being cold…” When Bruce dons warm weather long underwear and a cap, which happened to be red, the animals of the forest think he’s Santa Claus. Now he’s stuck — awake AND mistaken for someone else…again! This hilarious story is sure to be a holiday hit. It hits stores tomorrow, so get your copy asap!

Speak: The Graphic Novel by Laurie Halse Anderson, with artwork by Emily Carroll, is the graphic novel remake of the 1999 controversial novel, Speak. I read the novel years ago, and saw the movie, and supported the book with its presence in my former classroom library and today in the school library. I added the graphic novel this year, and I’m so glad that Melinda’s story is reborn for a whole new generation of readers. This is an important topic, and girls need to feel that they can SPEAK out against violence and isolation. If you haven’t read either of these books yet, read them soon.

Next up for me…continuing Seafire and Fresh Ink (see August 27th’s post) and this week’s anniversary reading of 14 Cows for America by Carmen Agra Deedy and Nine,Ten by Nora Raleigh Baskin. We remember.

 

It’s Monday! What are you Reading? is a meme hosted by Kathryn at The Book Date. It is a great way to recap what you read and/or reviewed the previous week and to plan out your reading and reviews for the upcoming week. It’s also a great chance to see what others are reading right now…you just might discover your next “must-read” book!

Kellee Moye, of Unleashing Readers, and Jen Vincent, at Teach Mentor Texts decided to give It’s Monday! What Are You Reading? a kidlit focus. If you read and review books in children’s literature – picture books, chapter books, middle grade novels, young adult novels, anything in the world of kidlit – join us! We love this meme and think you will, too. We encourage everyone who participates to visit at least three of the other kidlit book bloggers that link up and leave comments for them.

Book Review: Mixed: A Colorful Story by Arree Chung

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Consider this colorful picture book for your first days of school…for all ages and grades.

Yellows, Blues, and Reds live peacefully in a city, until one day, a Red declares, “Reds are the best!” The whole community is thrust into chaos — so much so that the three color groups must live apart, forming segregated neighborhoods. One day, Blue and Yellow are seen together with a new color…what will become of the union? In Mixed: A Colorful Story, Arree Chung shows us a world of colors, teaches us about tolerance, and how “mixing it up” might just be the best thing for everyone.

Why I Like This Book: My current school is a mix of old and new — students who have attended there and students who are now enrolled due to school closings and consolidation in our district. This is a perfect book to make students (and teachers) think about ways we can come together, and that being united is better than being alone.

Why You Should Read This Book: It’s colorful! (Hint: there’s an art lesson here — primary colors, secondary colors.) It includes simple and fun characters, but it also introduces a big message about communities that we all need.

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